Category: True Leaders

Trump Wins, the Fight for Change Begins 

 

Now that Donald Trump has won the race for the presidency, he must deliver policies that reflect the populist, anti-globalization feeling which propelled his campaign.

While progressives and Establishment Republicans are quick to dismiss Trump as a man who merely exploited Americans’ ugliest instincts, that dismissal is a serious mistake. Trump tapped into a groundswell of anti-globalization and anti-mass migration feeling that is rising across the U.S. and Europe.

“People really have had enough of the continued failure of a professional career political class who appear to be in it just for themselves, and almost devoid of principles or philosophy.”

“What Trump represents following hard on the heels of Brexit is pro-nation-state democracy, pro-border controls, and sensible immigration policies, and pro-standing up for our culture against the threat of Islamic terrorism,” former UKIP leader Nigel Farage told LifeZette in an exclusive interview.

“I’ve been coming back and forth to America regularly and talking to just huge numbers of people while I’m there and I think the crossover between the mood of our voters in June and the mood of the Donald’s voters now is astonishing,” he said.

“The rational, patriotic, and conservative voices of ordinary people, long suppressed, have once again found utterance in the wake of Brexit and Trump,” said Benjamin Harris-Quinney, chairman of the Bow Group, the U.K.’s oldest conservative think tank.

Harris-Quinney said the post-Trump victory era “will no longer be restrained by PC censorship and faux cries of ‘racism,’ ‘sexism,’ ‘homophobia,’ — and truth has the chance to flourish in the space that has been created.”

It’s not just happening in Britain and the U.S. In France, Marine Le Pen’s Front National is leading the polls heading into the 2017 elections. A poll released last week showed that nearly a full third of Frenchmen — 31 percent — think Le Pen’s hard-line stance on Islam would make the country safer.

In the Netherlands, Geert Wilders and his Party for Freedom are also leading the polls, a result mainly of their anti-Islamic immigration, anti-E.U. platform. Countries such as Hungary and Poland have governments led by national conservative political parties, and in many other countries across Europe, from Switzerland to Scandinavia, right-wing nationalist and populist parties are making substantial gains.

The U.S. political Establishment needs to come to terms with this new reality. The fight for these policies is what motivated voters to vote for Trump in droves, and they will surely hold Trump’s feet to the fire on those issues.

“If something is a pure protest, it isn’t a big enough motivation to get people to go to the polling stations in significant numbers,” Farage said. “There has to be a positive feeling that this is about change, this is about a radical change of direction that will be for the better,” he explained.

“I think too often people who vote for me, for Brexit, for Trump — they’re labeled as being ‘antis,’ they’re labeled as being negatives,” Farage said. “Actually when you poll these people you find, yes, of course they’re unhappy with the way things are but they’re voting for these new phenomena because they see in what’s being offered to them positive policy solutions.” Trump must do his utmost to get Congress to deliver those policy solutions.

People across the West are fed up with the erosion of the middle class that goes hand in hand with globalization, they are fed up with foreign wars, they are fed up with mass migration that threatens both their national security and their national identity, and they are fed up with an oppressive political correctness that stifles free speech and their ability to protest these things.

“People really have had enough of the continued failure of a professional career political class who appear to be in it just for themselves, and almost devoid of principles or philosophy,” Farage said. Trump must follow through on his America First message.

“Either this win takes over the Republican Party or you will see for the first time in a very long while a genuine attempt at a third party in American politics,” Farage predicted.

Source: Trump Wins, the Fight for Change Begins | LifeZette

EPIC: Trump Sends His First Tweet as President Elect… and It’s a Doozy!

Source: EPIC: Trump Sends His First Tweet as President Elect… and It’s a Doozy!

Trump’s Agenda: What his election means for America | Fox News

Donald Trump sent shockwaves rippling through America and across the globe Tuesday when voters rallied behind his longshot campaign and handed him victory over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton to make him the 45th president of the United States.Republicans also kept hold of their majority in the House of Representatives and were close to doing so in the Senate, giving Trump a friendly Congress with which to pass his legislative agenda.But, amid the slogans of “making America great again” and “draining the swamp,” what exactly does the billionaire businessman have planned for the country? The following is an overview of his agenda, compiled from his campaign website and other platform documents.

 

Source: Trump’s Agenda: What his election means for America | Fox News

News from The Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump claimed his place Wednesday as America’s 45th president, an astonishing victory for the celebrity businessman and political novice who capitalized on voters’ economic anxieties, took advantage of racial tensions and overcame a string of sexual assault allegations on his way to the White House.

Trump’s triumph over Hillary Clinton, not declared until well after midnight, will end eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House. He’ll govern with Congress fully under Republican control and lead a country deeply divided by his rancorous campaign against Clinton. He faces fractures within his own party, too, given the numerous Republicans who either tepidly supported his nomination or never backed him at all.

As he claimed victory, Trump urged Americans to “come together as one united people.”

Clinton, who hoped to become the nation’s first female president, called her Republican rival to concede but did not plan to speak publicly until Wednesday morning.

President Barack Obama invited Trump to meet with him at the White House on Thursday to discuss transition, and the White House said the president planned to address the election results in a statement Wednesday. White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Obama called Trump to congratulate him and also called Clinton to convey his admiration for the “strong campaign she waged throughout the country.”

The White House said Obama’s televised statement Wednesday would focus on “what steps we can take as a country to come together after this hard-fought election season.”

Trump, who spent much of the campaign urging his supporters on as they chanted “lock her up,” said the nation owed Clinton “a major debt of gratitude” for her years of public service. Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway said Obama and Trump had “a very nice talk” when the president called to congratulate him in the early hours Wednesday.

The Republican blasted through Democrats’ longstanding firewall, carrying Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, states that hadn’t voted for a GOP presidential candidate since the 1980s. He needed to win nearly all of the competitive battleground states, and he did just that, including Florida, Ohio, North Carolina and others.

Global stock markets and U.S. stock futures plunged, but later recovered somewhat, reflecting investor concern over what a Trump presidency might mean.

A New York real estate developer who lives in a sparkling Manhattan high-rise, Trump forged a striking connection with white, working class Americans who feel left behind in a changing economy and diversifying country. He cast immigration, both from Latin America and the Middle East, as the root of the problems plaguing many Americans and tapped into fears of terrorism emanating at home and abroad.

GOP Senate candidates fended off Democratic challengers in key states, including North Carolina, Indiana and Wisconsin. Republicans also maintained their grip on the House.

Senate control means Trump will have great leeway in appointing Supreme Court justices, which could mean a shift to the right that would last for decades.

Trump has pledged to usher in sweeping changes to U.S. foreign policy, including building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and suspending immigration from countries with terrorism ties. He’s also praised Russian President Vladimir Putin and spoken of building a better relationship with Moscow, worrying some in his own party who fear he’ll go easy on Putin’s provocations.

Putin sent him a telegram of congratulations early Wednesday.

Trump upended years of political convention on his way to the White House, leveling harshly personal insults against his rivals, deeming Mexican immigrants rapists and murderers, and vowing to temporarily suspend Muslim immigration to the U.S. He never released his tax returns, breaking with decades of campaign tradition, and eschewed the kind of robust data and field efforts that helped Obama win two terms in the White House, relying instead on his large, free-wheeling rallies to energize supporters. His campaign was frequently in chaos, and he cycled through three campaign managers.

Conway, his final campaign manager, touted the team’s accomplishments as the final results rolled in, writing on Twitter that “rally crowds matter” and “we expanded the map.”

Clinton spent months warning voters that Trump was unfit and unqualified to be president. But the former senator and secretary of state struggled to articulate a clear rationale for her own candidacy.

She faced persistent questions about her honesty and trustworthiness. Those troubles flared anew late in the race, when FBI Director James Comey announced a review of new emails from her tenure at the State Department. On Sunday, just two days before Election Day, Comey said there was nothing in the material to warrant criminal charges against Clinton.

Trump will inherit an anxious nation, deeply divided by economic and educational opportunities, race and culture.

Exit polls underscored the fractures: Women nationwide supported Clinton by a double-digit margin, while men were significantly more likely to back Trump. More than half of white voters backed the Republican, while nearly 9 in 10 blacks and two-thirds of Hispanics voted for the Democrat.

Doug Ratliff, a 67-year-old businessman from Richlands, Virginia, said Trump’s election was one of the happiest days of his life.

“This county has had no hope,” said Ratliff, who owns strip malls in an area badly beaten by the collapse of the coal industry. “Things will change. I know he’s not going to be perfect. But he’s got a heart. And he gives people hope.”

The Republican Party’s tortured relationship with its nominee was evident right to the end. Former President George W. Bush and wife Laura Bush declined to back Trump, instead selecting “none of the above” when they voted for president, according to spokesman Freddy Ford.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, a reluctant Trump supporter, called the businessman earlier in the evening to congratulate him, according to a Ryan spokeswoman. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the American people “have chosen a new direction for our nation.”

Associated Press writers Catherine Lucey, Jonathan Lemire, Lisa Lerer and Jill Colvin and AP Polling Director Emily Swanson contributed to this report.

Source: News from The Associated Press

Trump wins presidency, defeats Clinton in historic election upset 

Donald Trump, defying the pundits and polls to the end, defeated Hillary Clinton in Tuesday’s presidential election and claimed an establishment-stunning victory that exposes the depth of voter dissatisfaction – and signals immense changes ahead for American policy at home and abroad.

Seventeen months after the billionaire tycoon’s Trump Tower entrance into the race, the first-time candidate once dismissed by the political elite will become the 45th president, Fox News projects.

Speaking to cheering supporters early Wednesday morning at his victory party in New York City, the Republican candidate and now president-elect said Clinton called to congratulate him, and Fox News confirms she has conceded. Despite their hard-fought campaign, Trump praised Clinton for her service and said “it is time for us to come together as one united people.”

“I will be president for all Americans,” Trump vowed, after a brief introduction by running mate Mike Pence.

TRUMP’S AGENDA: WHAT HIS ELECTION MEANS FOR AMERICA

Sounding a call to “reclaim our country’s destiny,” Trump declared: “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer. … America will no longer settle for anything less than the best.”

Trump will be the oldest president in U.S. history, entering the Oval Office at age 70. With her defeat, Clinton falls short in her second bid to become the first female president of the United States.

Though Clinton called Trump, her campaign initially did not concede defeat. Earlier, her campaign chairman John Podesta addressed supporters nearby in New York and said several states were “too close to call.”

Clinton herself did not appear at the rally. Podesta had urged supporters to “head home” and said they would not have “anything more to say tonight.”

Amid Trump’s victory, Republicans also were projected to hold onto their majority in the House and Senate, improving Trump’s chances of advancing his agenda in office.

A surge of support in key battlegrounds – and especially surprise victories in states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin – helped propel Trump to victory. The GOP nominee built a commanding lead early on with wins in heavily contested North Carolina, Florida, Ohio and Iowa.

Clinton won her share of battlegrounds, including Virginia and Nevada and Colorado, but could not make up for Trump’s strong performance in other states thought to favor the Democrat.

The billionaire businessman’s victory marked a remarkable upset and turnaround, after he had been complaining amid a rough patch just weeks ago the vote could be “rigged” against him.

Clinton was still thought to have the clear advantage in the electoral map going into Tuesday’s vote, yet the polls had been tightening in the race’s closing days.

His victory could demonstrate just how much the dynamics were shifting in his favor – and perhaps how his true support was elusive all along to pollsters and others gauging the race.

Without question, his bid was helped over the last two weeks by a burst of setbacks for his opponent.

Eleven days before the election, FBI Director James Comey announced the bureau was revisiting the investigation into Clinton’s personal email server use while secretary of state, after discovering new messages on the laptop of disgraced ex-Rep. Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of a top Clinton aide. He closed the case again on Sunday, but the political damage may have been done. And the WikiLeaks release of emails hacked from Podesta’s account became a constant distraction for the campaign, as the messages revealed infighting, internal concerns about the Clinton family’s foundation and even evidence that the now-head of the Democratic National Committee leaked town hall questions to Clinton during the primaries.

This at times overshadowed the numerous allegations of sexual harassment and assault against Trump that came out in October (which he denies), following leaked footage from over a decade ago showing Trump making crude comments about women.

Trump’s victory marks the second time Clinton was thwarted in her bid to become the first female U.S. president, having been defeated by President Obama in their 2008 primary race.

But Trump has been able to defy expectations from the start. He defeated a deep field of 16 competitors during the Republican primaries – stitching together a motivated coalition of voters invigorated by his outsider, populist message; throwing his rivals off their talking points during a raucous marathon of debates; and commanding media attention throughout with his unpredictable, learn-as-he-goes campaign style.

He also defied party orthodoxy, railing against free-trade deals like NAFTA and the Trans Pacific Partnership and staking out a sometimes-confusing set of positions on foreign policy that may yet evolve. Democrats have criticized him heavily for statements expressing admiration for Russia’s Vladimir Putin and a desire to rebuild ties with Moscow.

Trump was aided by the infrastructure of the GOP, but his campaign never came close to the juggernaut operation mounted by Clinton. While she entered the final stretch of the race with an army of high-powered surrogates, Trump’s campaign was driven mainly by him, an inner circle of family members and a rotating set of top campaign advisers. Surrogates like retired Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani advocated aggressively for the Republican nominee, but he remained at odds with many influential elected Republicans who in some cases – as with House Speaker Paul Ryan – endorsed him, but only reluctantly. His stances on trade as well as his hardline immigration proposals – including variations on a plan to suspend Muslim immigration from certain countries – also made party brass uncomfortable.

Source: Trump wins presidency, defeats Clinton in historic election upset | Fox News

Who is 45th US President: Donald Trump in quotes — RT America

Enter a caption

I fell asleep before the Election results were all in last night and just cried and cried tears of joy when I seen this morning that our Trump won! God can Bless America again!!! May He bless Trump with wisdom always and bless us all!

Republican candidate Donald J. Trump has won the US presidential election, after arguably one the most controversial political campaigns in modern American history.

True to the statement he made at a rally in Delaware, Ohio last month, Donald Trump accepted the ‘favorable’ election results.

“I would like to promise and pledge to all of my voters and supporters and to all of the people of the United States that I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election … if I win,” the Republican said.

Trump edged past Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton who had hoped to claim the accolade of becoming the first female US president.

Trump previously accused Clinton of using the “woman card” to a level he had never seen before.

“All I’m doing is bringing out the obvious, that without the woman card, Hillary would not even be a viable person to even run for a city council position,” he said on NBC’s Today Show on April 28, 2016.

Despite being the underdog throughout the race, Trump never lost confidence in his ability to clinch the presidency, proclaiming at one point during the Republican primaries that he could “stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot people and I wouldn’t lose voters.”

The Republican candidate sparked furor numerous times throughout the race for the White House, because of his comments both online and in the public forum.

It was reported that Trump’s aides went as far as to take control of the presidential hopeful’s social media accounts in the final days of the campaign. The presidential candidate gained huge notoriety through the use of social media, with his tweets sparking thousands of retweets and news headlines.

Trump aides take over his Twitter account in final stages of campaign – report

Here RT looks back at Trump’s most contentious tweets (some of which were later deleted), which sparked meltdowns and accusations of xenophobia and bigotry against the candidate.

‘Mexican criminals’

Trump launched his candidacy in Manhattan in June 16, 2015 on an anti-Mexican platform.

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best … they’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people,” he said.

The candidate later promised to build a wall along the US-Mexico border, and repeatedly reiterated his wall proposal online, blasting Mexicans as “criminals”.

Source: Who is 45th US President: Donald Trump in quotes — RT America